How to Dry Ink on Vellum Quickly

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Translucent vellum paper rolled up

Why Ink Smudges on Vellum & Tips for Drying it Fast

Why does ink smudge on vellum? Quite simply, the wet ink of an ink jet printer has trouble adhering to vellum’s smooth, non-porous surface which may result in slow drying time and smudging.

If you’re having this issue, try the tricks below to dry ink faster and prevent smudging on your lovely vellum project.

Shop Vellum Paper | Tips & Tricks for Printing Vellum

 

 

Check vellum printer recommendations on LCIPaper.com

Make Sure it’s Inkjet Friendly

That’s right, not all vellum is inkjet friendly, so before you attempt any printing, do yourself a favor and make sure yours is!

Check the printer specs on our site (see right), or if you’re buying it elsewhere, check the package.

Try Draft Mode

Want ink to dry faster? Print less on the paper to begin with by using draft (quick, economy) mode.

Experiment with Paper Types

Your printer probably defaults to something along the lines of plain paper which is not always ideal for slick vellum. Switch it up to a translucent or fine art setting and you will likely get better results with ink adhesion.

Try the other Side

Yes, it may sound crazy, but depending on the vellum brand, one side sometimes prints better than the other. Due to various coatings and textures, one side may smudge, smear, and take an eternity to dry, and the other may be a breeze.

Rough it Up

To allow ink to better adhere to vellum’s slick surface, grab a newspaper or brown paper bag, ball it up, and lightly scrub the surface of the vellum. Don’t get too rough though – you don’t want visible scratches.

Let it Dry

After printing, just set your vellum aside and let it dry. Sometimes, even with all these tips and tricks, the stuff just needs an extra few minutes.

Blast it with Air

Ok, don’t blast it, per say. . . but if you don’t want to wait for your prints to dry, grab your hair dryer or heat embosser. But be careful – don’t turn it up too high or get too close because you might end up blowing the ink around the paper.

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