Wedding Invitation Wording – Divorced Parents

Divorced Parents
(Parents of Bride & Groom Divorce)


Mr. Sam Chase and Ms. Sara Chase
and
Mr. Carlton Jones and Ms. Elisa Jones
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Nicole Chase
and
Patrick Jones
on Saturday, the tenth of April
Two thousand and ten
at ten o’clock in the morning
St. Matthew’s Church
100 Pine Hill Drive
Boston, Massachusetts

Divorced Parents (Parents of the Bride)


Mrs. Lisa Linda Earl
and
Mr. John David Earl
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Elizabeth Sydney Earl
to
John Andy Smith
on Saturday, October first
Two thousand and ten
at five o’clock in the evening
Greenwich Country Club
100 Derby Road
New York, New York

Divorced Parents (Father of the Bride)


Mr. and Mrs. Steven Earl Jones
requests the honour of your
presence
at the marriage of his daughter
Jessica Ann Jones
to
Peter Smith
on June the sixth
two thousand and ten
at two o’clock in the afternoon
Greenwich CountryClub
100 Main Drive
Boston, MA

Divorced Parents (Mother of the Bride)


Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lachey
request the honour of your
presence
at the marriage of her daughter
Jessica Isabelle Simpson
to
Anthony Edwards Fords
on May fifth
2010
at six o’clock in the evening
St. Ann’s Church
200 Main Street
New York, New York
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52 Comments

  1. Chad MAney says:

    I need proper wording on invitations and programs for divorced parents.
    Father of Bride Divorced with girlfriend
    Mother of Bride Divorced with boyfriend
    Father of groom divorced and re-married
    Mother of Groom divorced and re-married
    Would like all names apart of wedding

  2. JB says:

    Hi Chad,

    INVITATION:
    With so many people involved, this is a bit more complicated since there is no standard for listing all the names on the invitations. We suggest not including the names but simply leading with:

    Together with their families
    Alice Smith
    &
    Chad Maney
    invite you to share in their joy

    PROGRAM:
    The program can be more personal and less formal than the invitation. Depending on the size of the program and how much space you are dedicating to the wedding party, you will need to use your discretion on who to include. We can only suggest including only the names that are actually involved in the ceremony as part of the wedding party.

    Perhaps you can add an acknowledgement section where you give special thanks to certain family members. You can include those people that you were not able to fit into the wedding party section.

  3. Amber says:

    I really want to include both my parents and his parents name on the invitation as they are all hosting the wedding. My parents are still married, however his parents are divorced and only his father has remarried, so there are three of them with the same last name. How can I do this??

  4. JB says:

    Hi Amber,

    This is a tough one because there is no norm for these circumstances. So the best etiquette would be those words that you come up with yourself, providing that it doesn’t lend itself to being offensive. Here is what we suggest:

    Mr. and Mrs. ________
    & [insert name of your fiance's mother]
    & Mr. and Mrs. ________

  5. SB says:

    My family is very complicated with a deceased parent, stepparent, ex-stepparent, etc. I’d like to avoid using family member names in the wording of the invitation while still acknowledging my dad for hosting. Can you do something like this?

    You are invited to celebrate the wedding of
    Bride and Groom
    Wedding Date and Details

    Bride’s Father’s Name or Hosted by: Bride’s Father’s Name

  6. JB says:

    Hi SB,

    The wording on an invitation can be as personal or standard as an individual would like. When there are extended circumstances surround previously married individuals or deceased parents, etc., the appropriate wording can become a concern. Always remember that this is your wedding and that what is appropriate for someone else does not mandate being appropriate or necessary for all. That being said, you may want to consider words such as:

    Please join the Bride’s Father’s Name in honoring the celebration of…

    or

    Please join the Bride’s Father’s Name along with other family members as they celebrate…

    Those are just a couple ideas for thought. We hope this is helpful to you.

  7. karen says:

    Hi, I have a question with differing answers from every website I’ve searched.

    Mom and Dad are divorced, but mom has taken back maiden name. Should it read:

    Ms. Jane Doe
    Mr. John Smith
    joyfully request the honor of your presence at the wedding of their daughter, etc.

    And can their names be on the same line? With an “and” in between? I can’t figure out which is wrong or right. The invitation design favors their names being on the same line…
    Thank you!

    • JB says:

      Hi Karen,

      Although there is never an absolute guide to proper etiquette when it comes to unique scenarios of this nature, we can make suggestions. Putting the names of both parents on one line is still proper and acceptable. It does not in any way indicate that they are together as a couple, only that they both share in the joy of this occasion. Using your mother’s maiden name, if that is the one she goes by formally at this time, is also acceptable.

      You may want to suggest your intent ahead of time to both parties so that before receiving the invitation, they are aware as to how it may read.

      We hope this information proves helpful to you and we wish you all the best in your special day ahead.

  8. Amy says:

    I would like to include my parents’ names (since they are financing the entire wedding) and my fiancés parents’ names, since we are very close. His parents are divorced and neither remarried. The mother still goes by her married name, not her maiden name. My question is, what format would you address this as? His parent’s are not involved with each other at all, not even in a friendly way. The divorce caused a lot of hurt between them and the family. I’m wondering how I would write this on the invitations without offending anyone, since it is a sensitive subject. What would your advice be?

    • JB says:

      Hi Amy,

      Our first thought is because it is your day, go with the wording you are contemplating. As a courtesy, you may wish to share it with your families before deciding. We think this is a sensitive approach to the matter and shows caring for all parties. Regardless of the parents’ personal situations, we trust they will remember that this is a day for the bride and groom and they will be supportive no matter what their circumstances are. Although there is no absolute way of wording this, you may wish to try something on the lines of:

      Mr. and Mrs. XYZ invite you to share in their joy (or in celebration)
      at the marriage of their daughter

      XYZ
      to
      XYZ
      son of the full name of the mother and the full name of the father (including last names for each of them)

  9. CS says:

    I have a very awkward situation. My mother is hosting the wedding. However, my father is still in my life and will be walking me down the aisle, just not contributing financially.
    A couple months ago, my mother and I had a huge falling out, I have cut her out of my life and she is no longer invited to my wedding, but she is still paying for the event.
    Do you have any suggestions for wording?
    Do I still include her name in the invitation?

    Thanks!

    • JB says:

      Hi CS,

      Since it is your wedding, both your mother and father should understand that you will word the invitation with as much sensitivity as possible, but ultimately the wording will be your decision. You may wish to show them in advance what you intend for the wording so that they’re not surprised. There is no set rule for this type of situation. As both parents are involved in different ways, you may wish to collectively acknowledge them (and your fiance’s parents) by keeping it simple not including their names. For example:
      Together with their parents
      [Bride] and [Groom]
      Invite you to join…

  10. Diane Robinson says:

    What is the proper wedding invitation wording for this situation: wedding couple want their full names, the bride’s parents are divorced but have the same last names, grooms parents are married with same last names but object to Mr. and Mrs.? Do the parents need to include middle names because the wedding couple are including theirs? FYI they prefer a casual format. Thanks!

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Diane,

      In situations such as these, many choose to use wording as simple as:

      Together with their parents (families)
      [Bride] and [Groom}
      Invite you to join. . .

      However, if you would like to include names, here is a more detailed suggestion:

      Jane Doe and Michael Doe
      and
      Susan and James Smith (groom's parents)
      Invite you to join as their children
      [Bride] and [Groom]
      Unite in marriage . . .

      Or more casually:

      Jane Doe and Michael Doe
      and
      Susan and James Smith (one last name alludes to marriage)
      Invite you to the marriage of their children
      [Bride] and [Groom]

      To answer your other question, it is certainly acceptable to not use parents’ middle names, especially since you are using a casual format.

  11. JD Esquire says:

    Bride’s parents are divorced and remarried; Groom’s parents are still married. Father and step-mother of bride are paying for wedding. Looking for wording on invitation which includes all parents but also makes clear Bride’s father and stepmother are hosting. Any suggestions?

    • JB says:

      Hi JD,

      As a courtesy, you may want to show all four parents the wording that you decide on. In this case, something like the following might make sense:
      [bride's mother's first & last name] & [bride's father's first & last name] invite you to share
      in the marriage of their daughter
      [bride's name]
      to
      [son's name]
      son of [groom's parents names, for example Trudy & David Esquire]

  12. Mmmm says:

    Hi-I am getting invites for a friend as a gift. He has been living with his mother and step father. His biological father has remarried. The brides Father is deceased. The bride insists on having her deceased father’s name on it and then he decided he wanted his parents on there too. Herein lies the problem with the two set of parents from the groom’s side. I’ve read your replies to other people and I am still unsure how to handle this situation. Do I say….
    Mr. and Mrs. Deceased Dad invite you to the marriage of their daughter (The Bride was happy with this part. So, I am guessing this is OK.),
    Jane Bride
    to
    Jon Groom
    Son of Biological Dad and Biological Mom
    Step-son of Step Dad and Step Mom (Is it rude to write step-son? I mean this is what he is to his biological parent’s spouses, but it sounds sort of….umm..I’m not really sure how to describe it. What do you think?)

    OR do I

    Son of Mr. & Mrs. Biological Dad-Name-Only
    And
    Son of Mr. & Mrs. Step-Dad Name-Only (but then I am excluding the biological mother’s name, which I am not too keen on doing)

    OR

    Son of Mr. Biological Dad and Mrs. Wife’s Name
    And
    Son of Mr. Step Dad and Mrs. Biological Mom

    I sort of like the last option for the Groom’s parents. Who would go first Biological Mom or Biological Dad? I was thinking since he lives with his biological mother their name should go first. Am I right in thinking that? The groom is concerned about offending either set of parents. In my opinion (which doesn’t really matter), it should be what they- the Bride and Groom want- but they just want to make everyone happy and avoid problems. I want to make them happy; so, I am going to word it the way they want it worded. I will be talking to his mother later this week to see what she wants. I am asking you to let her know I talked to a professional about this and got an opinion on it. I do appreciate your help. Thank you.

    • Kristen says:

      That is certainly a complicated wording situation, and a tremendous amount of wording to put on an invitation card.

      In many cases like these, couples choose to use the simply, all-encompassing wording:
      Together with their parents (or families)
      Bride
      and
      Groom
      invite you to join. . .

      The reason this option is so often used is because when you start entering all of the biological and step parent names so not to offend anyone, it can start to take over the invitation. Typically when this simple “together with their parents” option is used, all of the parents are mentioned by name in a wedding announcement and/or in the wedding ceremony program.

      Although you mentioned that the bride and groom wanted specific names on the card, it is important to remember that first and foremost, the day is about the bride and groom, not their parents.

  13. Mr. says:

    Have similar situation to JD Esquire and CS. Bride’s parents are divorced and remarried; Groom’s parents are still married. Step-mother of bride and mother of the groom are paying for wedding. Mother and current husband have not been a part of the wedding planning not paid for anything but are expected to come to the wedding. It will be a formal wedding with formal invitations. Ideas to keep the peace?

  14. Danielle says:

    How can I word my invitations if my father is paying for the hall, we are paying for everything else and my mom is help with what she can. I don’t want to insult anyone by not including them and I don’t want my dad to be upset that it seems like both parents are paying. I have read that the names you see are the ones contributing to the wedding so I want to make sure I am able to show them and not have anyone upset. Thanks!!

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Danielle,

      A simple, and increasingly common solution in situations like these is to use the wording:

      Together with their parents (or families)
      Jane Doe
      and
      John Smith
      invite you to join. . .

      This way, you are not specifically mentioning anyone, yet it is implied that you, your fiancee, and your parents are all involved in hosting the wedding. Another advantage to this wording is that you do not have a bunch of names cluttering the invitation card.

  15. BMG says:

    What is the proper way to word invitations in this situation? Bride’s parents are divorced mother is not remarried but does have a significant other, well common law, and still has her ex’s last name and father is remarried. All parents, bride and groom, are contributing to the wedding as well as other family members. Groom’s parents are married.

    • Kristen says:

      A simple, and increasingly common solution in situations such as these is to use the wording:

      Together with their parents (or families)
      Sarah Smith
      and
      William Jones
      invite you to join
      as they unite in marriage

      This way, everyone is indirectly included, and the only names that appear on the invitation card are the names that are most important for the event – the bride’s and the groom’s.

  16. Sharence says:

    HI my mom would like her name written out on the invitation she is still married. She doesn’t like Mr. & Mrs. James Smith, She would rather it say Mrs. Mary & Mrs. Paul Smith. How should that be written correctly.
    Sharence

  17. Nicole says:

    Hello,
    My situation is that I have a stepmother, who is paying for the wedding, a mother, who is not paying for the wedding but is still my mom, and the grooms parents who are still married, who are also helping to pay for the wedding and we have NO idea how to do the wording on the invitation. Also, we want to be careful as to how we list my stepmom and mom so it does not appear that they are married or dating. Please help!

    Thank you,

    Nicole

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Nicole,

      In situations like these, a common, and increasingly popular wording solution is:

      Together with their parents/families,
      Bride
      and
      Groom
      invite you to join

      This wording indirectly includes everyone, and keeps the invitation uncluttered, containing the most important names of the day only – the bride’s and the groom’s.

  18. Brooke says:

    Hello,
    I’d like to begin my invitation with a sweet phrase stemming from “all of my love, all of my life” which we are using in our vows. So we may have to use “our or their” Instead of my. I’d like to figure out how to have that as my beginning and then not use my parents name (who are divorced and it is fairly recent) however my parents are both paying for the wedding. So, I want the poem and to say “the parents of”? I’m not sure.
    Any advice?

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Brooke,

      You might just place that phrase on its own right at the top of the invitation card as is, perhaps in a decorative font, almost as it is part of the design. As far as wording suggestions, you may like one of the following:

      All of their love, all of their lives

      Together with their families
      Bride
      and
      Groom
      invite you to join

      - – - –

      All of our love, all of our lives

      Bride
      daughter of ….
      and
      Groom
      son of …
      invite you to join

      - – - –

      Finally,

      All of their love, all of their lives

      Bride’s Mom [last name] and Bride’s Dad [last name]
      invite you to join as their daughter
      Bride
      marries
      Groom

      I hope one of these helps!

  19. Samantha C says:

    OK So heres the deal, both my parents and his are hosting the wedding. My parents are still happily married however his father died when my fiance was 3. his mother has a live in boyfriend who is going to share her half of the exspences but they do not share the same last name and my fiance does not consider him a father figure. How do i include everyone into the invitation properly??

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Samantha,

      In situations like these, many couples choose the all encompassing wording, “together with their parents (or families).” This way, everyone is indirectly included, but the invitation card is not overcrowded with names.

      If you would like to include names, however, you might try the following:

      Mr. & Mrs. [Bride's Parents]
      and
      [Groom's Mom] and [Significant Other]
      invite you to celebrate the marriage of their children
      Bride
      and
      Groom

  20. Amanda Busser says:

    I’m not sure how to handle my situation. My parents just got divorced last month after 46 years of marriage. We no longer have contact with my father and he is not invited to the wedding. My mother took back her maiden name. My fiance and I are paying for most of the wedding. I just found out my fiance parents are give us money for the wedding… not sure how much yet. My mother is is helping with DIY projects but not financially. I think I should include my mother and his parents or “Together with their families Bride and Groom
    invite you to join…” I wondering how my mother’s name should be worded…. even if she is referred to in any other items. I plan to use her name and address for the return address. My mom thinks we should still use Mrs. with her maiden name instead of Ms.. It’s such a new and strange situation for me for my mother to have a different last name than me, which makes it seem like my parents were never married. From what I have read if she took back her maiden name she should be addressed as Ms..

    She just changed her name so I wonder if I should just include her married name. Any suggestions? Thanks!

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Amanda,

      In situations like these, “Together with their families/parents” is often the best. It leaves the invitation card uncomplicated and uncrowded, yet indirectly, all parties paying for the wedding are involved.

      Pertaining to your mother’s name on the envelopes, Ms. [Maiden Name] would be correct according to etiquette, as Mrs. refers to a married woman. However, etiquette is merely a suggestion, not a rule set in stone. If you or your mother are not comfortable with the “Ms.” title, you can simply write [First Name][Maiden Name]. What matters most is that the envelope arrives at the right address and everyone is comfortable with the situation.

  21. Dani says:

    My parents are divorced, mother took back her maiden name, neither are helping fund the wedding. Grooms parents are still married, and they are helping fund the wedding. We currently have this:

    mr. and mrs. first last
    and
    ms. last and mr. last

    request the honor of your presence
    at the marriage of their children

    groom’s name
    &
    bride’s name

    ~~~~~

    We were thinking because his parents are helping fund the wedding, their names (and respectively his name) should go first. Is this correct?

  22. Christina says:

    As with many of these other comments, the wording of invitations is a difficult thing to figure out. My situation is that my fiance and I are funding the majority of the wedding but our parents are also contributing and we would like our parents names to be listed as well. My parents are divorced and my father has remarried. My fiances parents will be divorced at the time of the wedding. What is the best way to word this?

    I was thinking something like but wasn’t sure if I am doing the brides parents part correctly:
    Mr. and Mrs. brides dad and Ms. brides mom
    Mr. grooms dad and Ms. Grooms mom
    request the honor of your presence
    at the marriage of their children
    Brides name
    and
    Grooms name

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Christina,

      Your wording seems perfectly fine. My only suggestion would be to make sure the groom’s mother’s last name is correct before printing; for example, make sure you use her maiden name is she decides to go back.

  23. Lindsey says:

    I’m not sure how to word my invite my mother is deceased my dad who is not remarried is financing a good part of the wedding. My Fiance’s parents are divorced and his mom is not remarried but his dad is. His dad and stepmom are contributing to the wedding so I feel they may be hurt if there not on the invite. How to I properly word this in a way that is traditional yet not to wordy. Thanks!

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Lindsey,

      “Together with their families (or parents)” is a popular way to phrase wedding invitations with a lot of names. It indirectly includes everyone without cluttering the invite.

  24. Kellsie says:

    Hello,

    My dad is paying 2/3 of the wedding, I (as the bride) am paying the other 1/3. Groom and groom’s parents are paying for rehearsal dinner and honeymoon. My parents are divorced and my mom cannot contribute financially. I would like everyone to be acknowledged on the invite somehow. My mom and dad still share the same last name, but he is remarried to a woman who now also has the same last name. Help please?

    Thank you!

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Kellsie,

      If you would like to acknowledge everyone, you might try the following:

      Together with their parents,
      [Bride's father and step mother] and [Bride's mother]
      and
      [Mr. and Mrs. Groom's parents]
      BRIDE
      and
      GROOM
      invite you to join. . .

      – or –

      [Bride's father and step mother] and [Bride's mother]
      invite you to the marriage of their daughter
      BRIDE
      to
      GROOM
      son of
      [Mr. and Mrs. Groom's parents]

      Just be sure that you increase the size of your name and your finance’s name so that it stands out the most.

  25. Bride2Be says:

    How would I address my invitation? Mother and Father divorced, but she has not changed her name. Both have long-term partners but have not remarried. Father is paying for most of the wedding, but the others, and us, are also contributing. Groom’s Father has passed away and his mother is single. How on earth do I word my invite? Thanks

    • Kristen says:

      The easiest way to address situations like these is to use the wording “Together with their parents” or, “Together with their families.” This way, the invitation card is not cluttered with names, and everyone is indirectly included.

  26. raquel says:

    Hello, my mother and father are divorced and each are contributing a 1/3rd of the cost of the wedding while my fiance and I are paying for the remaining 1/3rd. How do I word this on the invitation? Please help.

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Raquel,

      You could word this in a couple of ways:

      1) Together with their parents/families,
      [Bride]
      and
      [Groom]
      invite you to join. . .

      2)[Bride mother full name] and [Bride father full name]
      invite to you to celebrate the marriage of their daughter
      [Bride]
      to
      [Groom]
      son of [Groom's parents names]

      The first option is increasingly popular, and allows for the names of the bride and groom to stand out without overcrowding the invitation.

  27. Lee says:

    I would like my mother and father name (divorced) to be listed on the invitations along with my fiance’s parents whom are still married.

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Lee,

      Here are a few suggestions:

      {Bride}
      daughter of [parents]
      and
      {Groom}
      son of [parents]
      invite you to join. . .

      If parents are paying:

      {Bride’s Parents}
      and
      {Groom’s Parents}
      invite you to the marriage of their children
      {Bride}
      and
      {Groom}

  28. susan says:

    I have a similar situation as Mmmm’s question up above. My father is passed away, but I would like to honor him on the invitation. My fiance’s parents are divorced and both are remarried. How would this be worded besides using the “Together with out families” phrasing? My mother is paying for the wedding, so I want her name to be listed as the host. I don’t like the idea of lumping all parents into one big jumble. Thanks for your help.

    • Kristen says:

      You might use:

      [Bride]
      Daughter of [mother of bride] and the late [father of bride]
      and
      [Groom]
      Son of [any names you wish to list, step and non]
      Request the honor of your presence

  29. susan says:

    I have a similar situation as Mmmm’s question. My father has passed away, and my fiance’s parents are divorced and remarried. How would this be worded without using the phrase “Together with our families”? I realize that it would be much simpler by using this phrase, but we want to be specific and honor all our parents by naming them. Also, my mom is paying for our wedding, so I definitely want her to be at the top as she is the host. Thanks for your help!

  30. Elka says:

    How do you word an invitation when the bride and groom, the bride’s family and groom’s family are all jointly hosting together AND the bride’s parents’ are divorced with only the mother contributing but we’d like the bride’s father on the invitation too?

    • Kristen says:

      Hi Elka,

      You might try:

      Together with their parents

      BRIDE
      daughter of [parents' names]
      and
      GROOM
      son of [parents' names]
      invite you to join. . .

  31. Kristen says:

    Hi Cynthia,

    Traditional wedding etiquette suggests that whoever pays for the wedding does the inviting, as in:

    Mr. and Mrs. Joe Jones (or Jane and Joe Jones)
    invite you to the wedding of their daughter
    {BRIDE}
    to
    {GROOM}
    Son of Mr. and Mrs. . . .

    However, you do not necessarily have to use traditional etiquette. To simplify, you could always use something like:

    You are invited to the wedding of
    {BRIDE}
    daughter of (all parents listed)
    and
    {GROOM}
    son of (all parents listed)

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